Yarn and Coffee – June .. I finished projects!!!

Welcome. Pull up a chair on my porch.  Would you like an ice tea (sorry, I’m Canadian it’s not iced tea) maybe an ice coffee?  June’s Yarn and Coffee is a wee bit later than planned. The construction next door cut my phone line and we had to wait until today for it to be repaired.

I’m feeling very good about this month. I finally finished those wraps and a couple other new little projects!

made with Impeccable by Loops & Threads (FERN) / trim done with Vanna’s Choice by Lion Brand in Radiant Lime

made with Caron Cakes – Lemon Lime

 

made with Soft & Shiny by Loops & Threads – Royal Blue and Yellow

My oldest nephew graduated from high school and I couldn’t be prouder! Lots of awards and a few scholarships! So I had to make him a scarf with his universities colours!

I’m trying not to blink because when I do he’ll be graduating university as a mechanical engineer.

 

A few months ago I bought some new curtains. I just got around to making some tiebacks for them. So I guess I should add this project to the finished the PHD projects 😉

 


In July I think I’ll work on posting some more details about last months projects and working on my “Molly poncho”.

What came off your hook this month?

Did you make a gift for someone?

I do so love hearing about your yarn adventures. In my Reader, I found Tanglewood Knots highlights for June.

Monarch birthplace research

U of G Researchers Identify Monarch Butterfly Birthplaces to Help Conserve Species

University of Guelph researchers have pinpointed the North American birthplaces of migratory monarch butterflies that overwinter in Mexico, vital information that will help conserve the dwindling species.

The researchers analyzed “chemical fingerprints” in the wings of butterflies collected as far back as the mid-1970s to learn where monarchs migrate within North America each autumn.

FULL story: http://news.uoguelph.ca/2017/01/u-g-researchers-identify-monarch-butterfly-birthplaces-help-conserve-species/

Saving the Monarch #gotmilkweed

Saving the monarch butterfly

The monarch butterfly is threatened with extinction. Here’s what you can do to help save it.

By: David Suzuki and Jode Roberts Published on Sat Apr 16 2016 published on TheStar.com 

Three years ago, the eastern monarch butterfly population plummeted to 35 million, a drop of more than 95 per cent since the 1990s. More than a billion milkweed plants, which monarchs depend on for survival, had been lost to urbanization and weed killers throughout the butterfly’s migratory range — from overwintering sites in Mexico to their summer habitat in Canada.

We needed more milkweed in the ground, quickly. But many provinces and states listed the plant as “noxious, and few nurseries and garden centres carried local “weeds.”

A lot has changed in three years. The David Suzuki Foundation launched its #gotmilkweed campaign in April 2013 to encourage Toronto residents to plant milkweed in yards and on balconies. Foundation volunteer Homegrown Park Rangers also planted milkweed in local parks and schoolyards. The Ontario government pulled the plant from its naughty list and media stories about the monarchs’ plight took flight.

continue via link above.

monarch

Monarch at Rock Point Provincial Park, Ontario Canada

Why should I plant milkweed? (source: GotMilkWeed? )

Monarch butterflies depend on milkweed to survive. It’s the only plant on which monarch mothers lay their eggs and food source for monarch caterpillars. Over the past few decades, more than one billion milkweed plants have been lost across North America, largely due to widespread use of the herbicide glyphosate (Roundup) on millions of hectares of agricultural land. Planting milkweed throughout the monarchs’ migratory range is the single most important thing we can do to help them.