Saving the Monarch #gotmilkweed

Saving the monarch butterfly

The monarch butterfly is threatened with extinction. Here’s what you can do to help save it.

By: David Suzuki and Jode Roberts Published on Sat Apr 16 2016 published on TheStar.com 

Three years ago, the eastern monarch butterfly population plummeted to 35 million, a drop of more than 95 per cent since the 1990s. More than a billion milkweed plants, which monarchs depend on for survival, had been lost to urbanization and weed killers throughout the butterfly’s migratory range — from overwintering sites in Mexico to their summer habitat in Canada.

We needed more milkweed in the ground, quickly. But many provinces and states listed the plant as “noxious, and few nurseries and garden centres carried local “weeds.”

A lot has changed in three years. The David Suzuki Foundation launched its #gotmilkweed campaign in April 2013 to encourage Toronto residents to plant milkweed in yards and on balconies. Foundation volunteer Homegrown Park Rangers also planted milkweed in local parks and schoolyards. The Ontario government pulled the plant from its naughty list and media stories about the monarchs’ plight took flight.

continue via link above.

monarch

Monarch at Rock Point Provincial Park, Ontario Canada

Why should I plant milkweed? (source: GotMilkWeed? )

Monarch butterflies depend on milkweed to survive. It’s the only plant on which monarch mothers lay their eggs and food source for monarch caterpillars. Over the past few decades, more than one billion milkweed plants have been lost across North America, largely due to widespread use of the herbicide glyphosate (Roundup) on millions of hectares of agricultural land. Planting milkweed throughout the monarchs’ migratory range is the single most important thing we can do to help them.

 

 

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First “intermediate” crochet pattern ~ What I’ve learned by row 15

20160407_153235I’ve decided that my first “more complicated” crochet project will be the Sidewalk Shawl by Red Heart. { Designed by: Kimberly K McAlindin] I am loving the pattern and the Red Heart Soft yarn.  Red Heart Soft was a suggested substitute .

The pattern recommends..

Required Supplies:

  • STITCH NATION by Debbie Stoller® Bamboo Ewe®: 6 balls 5410 Mercury (Bamboo Ewe is discontinued)
  • Crochet Hook: 5mm [US H-8]
  • Yarn needle

You also will need stitch markers!! 20160407_153451 You can see how they’re used to mark the end /begining of each row during MarlyBird’s video.  MarlyBird also has a video about reading the pattern. Both video’s are helpful.

Included on Red Heart’s site is a diagram of the base pattern. I like having the diagram available as a visual reference.

A few things that I found helpful while reading the pattern so far…

  1. READ the whole pattern before starting. Read the special stitches and the abbreviations .
  2. READ the whole row’s instructions before starting the row.

This isn’t a book. You’re not going to spoil the ending by reading ahead!!

3.  Mark what row you are currently working on.  I’ve even gone so far as to cover the other rows because I’m looking from my work to the pattern frequently. I mixed two rows.

You KNOW someone will talk to you and keep talking to you even if you count your stitches out loud.

learning crochet pattern (2)

mark which row you are working

learning crochet pattern (5)

cover other rows if need to look from work to pattern frequently

The video was a tad long, so I may have missed this but they didn’t seem to address the pattern past the base rows. For me, someone who is attempting their first intermediate pattern I found the instruction (which first appears in Row 13)

repeat from * across end at **

a little confusing. It took a little research but I found it to mean repeat the section of pattern across the row until the end.

20160407_153355

I’m looking forward to seeing how this turns out! I’ll make sure to add another post when I’m done.

The pale green behind the soft gray shawl is a simple wrap that I’m making. I’ll also post posts and talk more about the super easy pattern to make it.

What’s on your hook?

Monarch population rebounds (rebloged post)

Monarch population rebounds in Mexico

 

Posted by in Wildlife on Monday, February 29, 2016

North America’s monarch butterfly population has more than tripled in Mexico this winter, despite reaching dangerously low numbers in the past.

 

This season, the monarchs covered the area so densely they had to be counted by the area they covered instead of individually. An estimated 150 million insects made the trip this year, compared to only 35 million in 2013.

the rest of Amely Coulombe’s article can be found ~~  http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/blog/posting.asp?ID=1865

For comments/likes kindly visit the original post.